Educational Objectives and Student Outcomes and Process for Continuous Improvement

Voluntary Accreditation of an Engineering Curriculum is performed by a visiting committee of members of the relevant professional engineering and technical societies. ABET was founded in 1932 and accredits more than 660 colleges and universities in 23 nations that offer more than 3100 programs. Our Departmental programs have met the required educational standards and objectives of the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET since their inception. Typically the process takes place at six year intervals.  The Mechanical Engineering Program and the Aerospace Engineering Program are accredited by the EAC, Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org

ME and AE Program Educational Objectives are reviewed each year with our faculty at the 1st Faculty Meeting of the year, with our students at our Upper Class Advising Meetings once or twice per year, with our Alumni at our annual Alumni Reception during Reunions, and with our Advisory Council every other year when the council meets.

 

Educational Objectives for the Aerospace Engineering Program

Objective No. 1
Our graduates will think critically and creatively and excel in applying the fundamentals of aerospace engineering.

Objective No. 2
Our graduates will pursue a life of curiousity with a desire for learning and have the ability and self-confidence to adapt to rapid and major changes.

Objective No. 3
Our graduates will advance toward leadership in shaping the social, intellectual, business and technical worlds and by excelling in diverse careers.

 

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PROCESS -- AEROSPACE ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Our process for continuous improvement has multiple components and follows a traditional PDCA (plan-do-check-adjust) strategy. First, we capture data about the aerospace engineering program from a number of sources including students, alumni, faculty, and student records. In particular, we focus on student outcomes which are measured by Senior Independent Work/Senior Thesis/Senior Project.  In addition, data concerning teamwork is collected in the program specific design courses MAE 332-MAE 342.  Next, the undergraduate committee evaluates and reviews all aspects of the aerospace engineering program including enrollment and retention, on an annual basis. The findings of such reviews and the supporting data are presented to the departmental faculty at the first meeting of the academic year. A discussion about the aerospace engineering program follows this presentation and if deemed necessary, potential program changes are referred back to the Undergraduate Committee for study and recommendation. Any changes recommended by the Undergraduate Committee would be brought back to the departmental faculty for acceptance, modification or rejection. If accepted we implement the changes in accordance with University wide regulations and track the effect of the change using our assessment instruments (for example, performance indicators, course evaluations). Since the aerospace engineering program is reviewed annually any changes would be implemented in subsequent years following the initial assessment. The MAE faculty drives the process, which involves two of our core constituencies: current students in the aerospace engineering program through a yearly faculty-student forum and a survey of the graduating class, and the departmental advisory board through their bi-annual meeting. The following chart summarizes the process of continuous improvement followed in the MAE department aerospace engineering program:

 

 

Educational Objectives for the Programs in Mechanical Engineering

Objective No. 1
Our graduates will think critically and creatively and excel in applying the fundamentals of mechanical engineering.

Objective No. 2
Our graduates will pursue a life of curiousity with a desire for learning and have the ability and self-confidence to adapt to rapid and major changes.

Objective No. 3
Our graduates will advance toward leadership in shaping the social, intellectual, business and technical worlds and by excelling in diverse careers.

 

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PROCESS -- MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Our process for continuous improvement has multiple components and follows a traditional PDCA (plan-do-check-adjust) strategy. First, we capture data about the mechanical engineering program from a number of sources including students, alumni, faculty, and student records. In particular, we focus on student outcomes which are measured by Senior Independent Work/Senior Thesis/Senior Project.  In addition, data concerning teamwork is collected in the program specific design courses MAE 322-MAE 412.  Next, the undergraduate committee evaluates and reviews all aspects of the mechanical engineering program including enrollment and retention, on an annual basis. The findings of such reviews and the supporting data are presented to the departmental faculty at the first meeting of the academic year. A discussion about the mechanical engineering program follows this presentation and if deemed necessary, potential program changes are referred back to the Undergraduate Committee for study and recommendation. Any changes recommended by the Undergraduate Committee would be brought back to the departmental faculty for acceptance, modification or rejection. If accepted we implement the changes in accordance with University wide regulations and track the effect of the change using our assessment instruments (for example, performance indicators, course evaluations). Since the mechanical engineering program is reviewed annually any changes would be implemented in subsequent years following the initial assessment. The MAE faculty drives the process, which involves two of our core constituencies: current students in the mechanical engineering program through a yearly faculty-student forum and a survey of the graduating class, and the departmental advisory board through their bi-annual meeting. The following chart summarizes the process of continuous improvement followed in the MAE department mechanical engineering program:

 

Students who successfully complete our program will have satisfied the following ABET Program Outcomes:

 

1.   an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics

2.   an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors 

3.   an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences

4.   an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts 

5.   an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives

6.   an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions

7.   an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

 

 

Undergraduate Graduation and Enrollment Data (September 2019.V2)

Class Year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Mechanical 22 17 6 17 27 15 16  
Aerospace 3 2 2 1 1 1 4  
Mechanical & Aerospace 25 23 31 31 21 36 37  
Undeclared             2 55
Total 50 42 39 49 49 52 59 55